End AIDS: HIV Prevention and Outreach Summit Tracks

End AIDS: HIV Prevention and Outreach Summit

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Selected Workshops by Track

The Continuum of Care

The workshop will be focused on NMAC ( National Minority AIDS Council 50+ Strong & Healthy project and Long-Term HIV Survivors engagement project. The workshop will not only explore clinical and medical information but also discuss topics such as socioeconomic status, stigma, Social Isolation, Mental Health, Sexual Health for people living with HIV over 5 0 years of age, discussing the best practices to improve their overall quality of life and wellness.

  • Teresa Sullivan, PWN-USA
  • Fernando De’ Hoyos, MSW, National Minority AIDS Council
  • Jeffery Haskins, Philadelphia FIGHT

Social media websites and apps are continuing to grow in their role as the places where people gather online to read news, engage in discussion, socialize, date and more. Because of this, efforts are increasingly being made to engage and/or retain PLWHA in care using social media tools such as existing social networks or new apps with social media features. In this panel, hear from four speakers from different types of organizations that are leveraging social media to engage and retain people in care across the continuum. Bring your smartphone; you might have the chance to download these apps or follow these social media campaigns during the discussion. Social Media in the Treatment of HIV Across the Care Continuum.

  • Claire Beamish, Children’s Hospital Of Philadelphia
  • Beatrice Aladin, New York AIDS Institute – Office of the Medical Director State Department of Health
  • Winner Bell, MSW, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Ann Avery, MD, MetroHealth Medical Center

“Hey Doc, We Need to Talk” is an interactive experience designed to enhance patient-initiated information exchanges for individuals living with HIV/AIDS. The quality of patient-provider interactions is an important factor in one’s overall health care, as well as a critical component of treatment adherence and success. Navigating these interactions, however, can be difficult. Through standardized patient scenarios, personalized question development, and checklists, panelists will demonstrate strategies and tools with which patients can more effectively engage their providers in conversations surrounding HIV/AIDS. Dialogue and audience participation is highly encouraged, and will be facilitated. Individuals will walk away more confident in their ability to approach healthcare providers and advocate for their specific health needs.

  • Laura Bamford, MD, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Grace Paik, MD, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Chloe Gould
  • Steven Buffer
  • Nick Salter
  • Kristine Pham

The Cure

Have you heard about HIV cure research? Have you ever wondered what it was all about, but weren’t sure who to ask? Here’s your chance! The purpose of this workshop is to take the mystery out of HIV cure research. Nurses and clinic staff who meet regularly with HIV cure research clinical trial participants will discuss the questions they face every day, such as:

  1. What does the process look like?
  2. What questions have been posed by people considering enrollment?
  3. How do we move from recruitment to participation?
  4. What does participation mean?
  5. What does it mean to be in a Phase I trial?
  6. What kind of care and support are given during the study?
  7.  What is an analytical treatment interruption (ATI)?
  8. How do HIV cure researchers balance the excitement of HIV cure research with having to turn down someone living with HIV who might not be able to participate in a trial?
  • Beth Peterson, The Wistar Institute
  • Kenneth Lynn, RN, University of Pennsylvania
  • Linden Lalley-Chareczko, MA, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Katrina Millard, MS, AGPCNP-BC, The Rockefeller University

Faith-Based

Learning to celebrate God in the midst of an HIV diagnosis. Panelists share their own stories and the impact of religion and theology as barriers to HIV treatment and stigma reduction. Panelists discuss the long journey away from rejection and condemnation and toward acceptance, resilience, healing, and a renewed embrace from God.

  • Rev. Calenthia Dowdy, PhD, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Deacon Vernon Wright Beloved St. John Evangelistic Church
    Grace Rutha, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Rev. Aquarius Gilmore, U.S Department of Health & Human Services

Participants will learn the importance of a self care plan and tools for developing positive self care strategies geared toward preventing burnout among social service professionals serving PLWHAs and PLWHAs themselves. This is important for the positive physical and mental health of PLWHAs and those who serve their needs. The workshop is interactive and requires involving the audience’s experiences and needs in forming strategies. It does not address specifically oppression or racism, but does provide self care strategies to help the individual be their best selves in their work to combat it.

  • Rev. Chris Kimmenez, PsyD, Healing Communities USA/ RCC Urban CDC

Through snapshots of the above titled documentary, this interactive workshop will engage the audience into a triumphant testimonial experience of a gospel singer, who was widowed at 29 years of age and living with HIV. This award-winning documentary chronicles the true story of Tangy Major, a young woman, who in the ’80s unknowingly contracted HIV from her boyfriend, became pregnant, and transmitted the virus to her baby. Seven months after giving birth, she buried her son. Seven years later she buried the man who became her husband.

Tangy was HIV positive, widowed, and childless all before the age of 30. HIV/AIDS had taken almost everything she had–but it couldn’t take her faith in God and her ability to glorify him through song. Tangy’s Song! is a compelling and compassionate film that moves from tragedy to triumph–and from fear to faith–as one young HIV positive woman shares more than just her story. She shares her song! From devastation to restoration!

This is my story…

  • Tangy Major, MA

Scientific research supports the connection between belief in higher power(s) and healing of our physical bodies. The goal of this panel is to examine the role of faith and faith communities in facilitating healing. Panelist will examine several of the research samples available and consider real relationships and barriers between faith, faith leaders, faith communities, and the possibilities of healing when melded with medicine.

  • Calenthia Dowdy
  • Mary L. Harper, DBHIDS
  • Lizzy Schmidt, MSN, CRNP, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Sarina DiBianca, SILOAM Wellness
  • Terry Guerra, Catholic Church

A conversation of causation and strategies for healing trauma, stigma and rejection of PLWHIV and other vulnerable populations by their faith communities.

  • Rev. Paula Burnett-Kimmenez, AA, General Studies RHD/RCC Urban CDC
  • Rev. Chris Kimmenez, PsyD, Healing Communities USA/RCC Urban CDC

Hepatitis and HIV

The opioid epidemic is driving new cases of HIV and HCV. Hepatitis C is no longer a problem that is focused in the baby boomer population. There is a growing number of new cases of HCV among a younger cohort that mirrors that of the opioid epidemic

  • Lora Magaldi, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Stacey Trooskin, MD, MPH PhD, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Alex Shirreffs, MPH, Prevention Point Philadelphia
  • Jose Benitez, MPH, City of Philadelphia

Studies have found high rates of hepatitis B (HBV) co-infection among PLWHA. For PLWHA, having an HBV co-infection can complicate disease management and lead to worse health outcomes. Additionally, recent survey data indicate that PLWHA have low rates of HBV vaccine, and are at risk for HBV infection. HBV continues to be an under-diagnosed illness among high risk communities. For far too long, HIV/HBV co-infection has remained under-prioritized throughout the public health community. It is time that we bring the impact of HIV/HBV co-infection to the forefront of our discussion to promote increased awareness, education and testing for HBV within the HIV community. Additionally, we should discuss strategies to improve vaccination rates among high risk non-immune individuals, to break the cycle of infection. This workshop is designed to first provide a brief background on HBV (epidemiology, risk factors, management of chronic infection) and discuss why it is important to understand HBV in PLWHA. The second part of this workshop will share the personal story of a patient advocate living with HIV/HBV co-infection.

  • Catherine Freeland, MPH, Hepatitis B Foundation

An estimated 50,000 Philadelphians have hepatitis C and at least 18% of HCV infected Philadelphians are co-infected with HIV. Whether you want to understand the basics of hep C, need to brush up on key hep C talking points, or are looking for answers to questions about hepatitis this workshop will give you an overview of hep C transmission, prevention and treatment. Learn about this epidemic, how it’s ongoing and the resources available. Come to this workshop for the info you need to be a hepatitis advocate and educator!

  • JackHildick-Smith, BS, Philadelphia Department of Public Health
  • Amy Hueber, MSW, Philadelphia Department of Public Health AIDS Activities Coordinating Office
  • Alison Roberts, BS, Philadelphia Department of Public Health
    Emily Waterman, BS, Philadelphia Department of Public Health

HIV and Aging

The workshop will be focused on NMAC ( National Minority AIDS Council 50+ Strong & Healthy project and Long-Term HIV Survivors engagement project. The workshop will not only explore clinical and medical information but also discuss topics such as socioeconomic status, stigma, Social Isolation, Mental Health, Sexual Health for people living with HIV over 5 0 years of age, discussing the best practices to improve their overall quality of life and wellness.

  • Teresa Sullivan, PWN-USA
  • Fernando De’ Hoyos, MSW, National Minority AIDS Council
  • Jeffery Haskins, Philadelphia FIGHT

With HIV becoming a manageable chronic illness, there are more older adults living with HIV today than at any point in history. As people living with HIV grow older, many of their needs change and new obstacles to receiving effective care may arise. This workshop will discuss the components of healthy aging, debunk the myths of aging, and explore how to age successfully with a chronic illness. Various dimensions of wellness will be outlined including sexual well-being, emotional and social well-being, physical health, and environmental wellness. The panel will discuss aging related resources and the intersectionality between HIV and aging. Participants will also hear from long-term survivors sharing their experiences with aging and accessing community resources.

  • Katie Young , Master of Science in Gerontology Philadelphia Corporation for Aging
  • David Griffith, Master of Science in Social Policy, LGBT Elder Initiative
  • Terri Clark, MPH, Action Wellness
  • Jay Johnson, MBA, Action Wellness
  • Keith Carter, LGBT Elder Initiative

Long-term survivors – those who were diagnosed with HIV in the 1980s and early 1990s – have lived through decades of challenging conditions. From being diagnosed at times when HIV was considered a terminal illness, to the countless losses of friends and loved ones, long-term survivors have encountered many traumas and experiences with grief. While long-term survivors demonstrate tremendous resiliency, many are also dealing with the long-term effects of the sustained trauma of the AIDS crisis. Recent efforts are starting to look at HIV survivorship as being closely associated with complex post-traumatic stress disorder, a form of PTSD arising from ongoing and repetitive exposure to trauma. Additional efforts have proposed the concept of “AIDS Survivor Syndrome” to capture certain physical and mental symptoms for which long-term survivors face increased risk. This workshop will explore the physical and mental health issues that are prevalent among long-term survivors and how these issues relate to the trauma and grief experienced throughout the AIDS epidemic. Panelists include providers in the healthcare and mental health fields as well as long-term survivors talking about their personal experiences.

  • David Griffith
  • Kathleen Brady, MD, AIDS Activities Coordinating Office
  • Heshie Zinman, MBA, LGBT Elder Initiative
  • Teresa Sullivan, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Jay Segal, M.Ed, Psychology, Psychologist (Private Practice)
  • Deanne Jenkins, LGBT Elder Initiative
  • David Gana, LGBT Elder Initiative

HIV and Substance Use

This workshop will address the gaps in prevention services as it pertains to sex workers and women who use substances. We will discuss the ways in which pre-existing services can incorporate better techniques to serve this community, as well as understand the specific concerns they face in prevention. The increased inclusion of sex workers and substance users into these services only further serves the cities need to reduce stigma and reduce harm in our communities. We will also address the way community members can assist each other in prevention measures that do not rely on a medical or social service agency

  • Nina Marsoopian, BA, Project Safe and Philadelphia Red Umbrella Alliance

With rates of overdose deaths climbing to epidemic levels in Philadelphia and across the U.S., service providers and those living in community with people living with addictions must be equipped to intervene in the event of an overdose, and to prevent overdoses before they happen. This workshop describes how to meet clients living with addiction “where they’re at” through harm reduction practice methodologies, how to identify symptoms of an overdose, and how to use Narcan (Naloxone) to revive a person who is overdosing. The second half of this workshop will be dedicated to learning how to use Narcan (Naloxone), and the first 50 people in attendance will be given a Narcan (Naloxone) Kit to carry with them.

  • Elvis Rosado Prevention Point Philadelphia

The opioid epidemic is driving new cases of HIV and HCV. Hepatitis C is no longer a problem that is focused in the baby boomer population. There is a growing number of new cases of HCV among a younger cohort that mirrors that of the opioid epidemic

  • Lora Magaldi, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Stacey Trooskin, MD, MPH PhD, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Alex Shirreffs, MPH, Prevention Point Philadelphia
  • Jose Benitez, MPH, City of Philadelphia

Philadelphia is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, which has affected the lives of many city residents. Drug overdoses killed 702 Philadelphians in 2015, 907 in 2016, and are expected to have killed over 1,200 in 2017 once numbers are finalized.   In 2016, 80% of drug deaths involved an opioid, and fentanyl is increasingly a contributing cause of death among overdose decedents.   To address the opioid crisis in Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Department of Public Health launched the Opioid Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Prevention Program (OSEPP) in 2017. In this session, attendees will learn about the opioid epidemic in Philadelphia and the work OSEPP is conducting to help save lives.

  • Allison Herens, LSW, Philadelphia Department of Public Health
  • Monica Sun, MPH, Philadelphia Department of Public Health
  • Ashley Kemembin, Philadelphia Department of Public Health

There are many benefits of Art for people with HIV/AIDS and those who are trying to find coping strategies in dealing with a plethora of illnesses. Our society has developed new and different options to personally illustrate what individuals are experiencing emotionally, mentally and spiritually. To express what each participant is feeling deep inside themselves, this workshop will be presented in threefold. 

The first 15 minutes: 
 I will provide a demonstration for how painting may be used to expel the deepest of emotions. I will exhibit anger and begin shuffling papers, pencils and art supplies. I will find a paper that shows a woman who is very angry. I will say loudly: “This is how I feel, ANGRY!!!” I will prop up the photograph and begin to paint. Muttering my feelings, exclaiming how much my feelings affect me, I will draw the viewers in. I will show them the finished result and ask them to paint what each is feeling.
 
The second 15 minutes:
1). The viewer chooses an emotion. (Anger, shame, remorse, guilt)
2). The person begins to paint.
3). The participant must focus on making the emotion match the art they are painting. 

I will provide the painting materials necessary for each participant, from painting materials to easels. We will see a variety of emotions that each are feeling and have a need to express. Every class will end with a chance to talk about what each was feeling, what happened after Painting to Transform

  • Cassandra Jefferson, BA in Illustration
  • Susan M. Fleetwood, MHS-CECS, Be More Grateful Inc.
  • Gloria Turner MA, Med, LCDP, CAADC, Synergy Consultants and Psycho Therapy

As Philadelphia continues to be at the epicenter of the opioid epidemic due to the purity and low cost of heroin, HIV remains epidemic among persons of color and there continue to be increases in new HCV infections. Engagement of new HIV and HCV positive individuals is difficult, especially if the participant is actively using injection drugs. Those with injection drug use histories are often skeptical of engaging in medical care because of barriers like access to care, lack of education, provider proximity, and fear of mistreatment. Additionally, drug treatment, housing needs, and lack of income are prioritized over treatment. Prevention Point Philadelphia (PPP) has implemented services to guide participants into care while addressing any barriers and participant needs. Homelessness, partnered with active injection drug use, has made it more difficult for these individuals to seek services. This presentation is meant for frontline staff who are seeking support or new strategies to link participants who may not be ready for care. The purpose is to allow service providers and frontline staff a space to collaborate ideas for increasing capacity and to share experiences with navigation in order to take best practices back to their agencies. We will discuss successes, challenges, and strategies for engaging newly diagnosed individuals. Our focus will be on discussing integrating harm reduction into testing and counseling sessions in order to bolster participant engagement.

  • Jennie Coleman, MPH, Prevention Point Philadelphia
  • Laura DeCastillo, Prevention Point Philadelphia
  • TaWanda Preston, Prevention Point Philadelphia
  • Jade McKnight, CC Change

The opioid epidemic has increased the numbers of people who inject drugs and therefore has increased community risk of HIV infection. Existing Pennsylvania drug treatment options do not include PrEP. This talk outlines how PrEP could importantly and easily be incorporated into many existing drug treatments, especially Medication Assisted Treatments. The design of drug treatment options are explained, including the newly established Centers of Excellence for Opioid Treatment. Finally, PrEP prescribing is overviewed to inform both the community and professionals on how the best opioid treatments include PrEP.

  • Kevin Moore, PsyD, AIDS Care Group
  • Trisha Acri, MD, AIDS Care Group

Philadelphia city officials recently announced that they would actively encourage and support the establishment of one or more safe consumption facilities. These facilities would not only reduce the potential for fatal overdose by providing medically supervised drug consumption, but are also predicted to reduce other harms associated with drug use (disease transmission, such as HIV and hepatitis C, and injection-related infections) and serve as an access point to drug and alcohol treatment, housing, and other social services. These facilities have also been shown to reduce public drug consumption and improper disposal of drug paraphernalia. Despite a long record of positive outcomes, there are several barriers to implementing such a facility in Philadelphia, including legal impediments and public acceptance. This panel will allow attendees to hear from advocates and experts in the field and ask questions about barriers to implementation.

  • Dan Martino, Community Organizer in Kensington, PA 177th District State Representative Candidate
  • Evan Anderson, JD, PhD, Senior Fellow, Center for Public Health Initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania
  • Devin Reeves, MSW, Executive Director, Pennsylvania Harm Reduction Coalition
  • Christina Garces, MD/MA, student at Temple University Co-Founder, SOL (Save Our Lives) Collective
  • Joseph L. D’Orazio, MD, Director, Division of Medical Toxicology in Temple University Hospital’s Department of Emergency Medicine
  • Allison Herens, MSW, Opioid Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Prevention Program, Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Housing and Homelessness

The state of housing services in the city of Philadelphia seems to be a mystery to many of those seeking affordable, stable, or supportive housing services. For those trying to be a support to those seeking housing it can be an equally daunting task. Housing is an important resource, and as it seems at a scarcity when one just looks out over the precipice of paper work, processes and procedures, as well as wait time to get into housing. This workshop will be a simple overview. It will discuss the current state of housing in the city of Philadelphia, offer tips and tricks for navigating the housing system, as well as attempt to look at the various entry points for finding housing.

  • Sharee Heaven, HOPWA

What can you do to stay healthy when you don’t have a place to stay? People experiencing homelessness often have health issues that otherwise are not otherwise common due to not having access to a place to keep their things, places to shower or bathe, or doctors that understand the issues they’re having. Problems with feet and skin, diabetes, and not having safe places to use substances can all become a lot worse in these conditions than they would otherwise be. Learn about what a person experiencing homelessness can do to keep themselves healthy.

  • Clare Schoenberg, PA-C, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Jennie Coleman, MPH, Prevention Point Philadelphia

Our “Surviving and Thriving: Sex Work, Homelessness and How to Stay Safe” panel will focus primarily on the personal journeys of people experiencing homelessness who engage in sex work and survival sex. Specifically, this panel will host individuals working in the industry as a means to share their personal experiences, past or current, engaging in sex work and survival sex. This will serve as a forum for these panelists to share in a judgement free space and as a way to provide information on what they do to stay safe in all respects, including: safety while using substances, safety while engaging in sex work, safety from the police, or sexual safety. Following these lived experience narratives, we will have Nina Marsoopian, a Project Safe volunteer with lived experience herself, and Dr.  Alexis Roth, an assistant professor at the Dornsife school of Public Health at Drexel University with a wealth of relevant knowledge who is currently piloting a project designed to improve access to PrEP for women who inject drugs in Philadelphia as speakers. Nina will discuss her personal experiences both volunteering with Project Safe and as someone with lived experience as a sex worker and youth who has engaged in survival sex. Dr. Roth will discuss her work as well as the resources available in the city to support people experiencing homelessness who engage in sex work and survival sex. We want to stress once again the importance of this panel being a completely safe space and judgment free for individuals working in the sex industry and for people who use substances.

  • Project Safe Volunteer
  • Alexis Roth, Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health
  • Nina Marsoopian, BA, Project Safe and Philadelphia Red Umbrella Alliance
  • Zach Fusfeld

Approximately 1.6 million youth are homeless each year and up to 40% of those youth identify as LGBT. More than 1 in 4 teenagers are thrown out of their homes after coming out to their parents. Youth living on their own are at a higher risk for anxiety disorders, depression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suicide attempts and other health problems due to the enhanced exposure to violence. In this panel discussion, you will gain insight into the physical and mental health implications of homelessness and the current efforts that have stemmed from the City of Philadelphia lead; Philly Homes 4 Youth Housing Coalition, and other local agencies are taking to understand and address youth homelessness. This panel is for health professionals, social service providers, policy makers, community members, and anyone else interested in understanding the intersection of housing and wellness among LGBTQ youth. We hope to generate a discussion with varied perspectives, and hope you will leave with a call to action on how you can help end youth homelessness.

  • Elaina Tully, MD, Medical Director, YHEP Adolescent Health Center; Physician, John Bell Health Center / YHEP Health Center @ Philadelphia FIGHT Community Health Centers
  • Joseph Hill-Coles, Community-Navigator @ Youth Service INC.
  • Libby Mathewson, Street Outreach and Homeless Prevention Services Supervisor @ Valley Youth House

In the Field

Community Advisory Boards (CABs) are one way for community members to inform, stay updated on and use findings from research that impact their communities. Behind the walls of a large university setting, communities may feel disengaged and not know how to become involved in research. At the same time, researchers may not know how to engage communities most effectively. One of the ways that the University of Pennsylvania and the Wistar Institute involve the HIV community is through the activities of four CABs affiliated with the following research initiatives: Center for AIDS Research (CFAR), Penn Mental Health AIDS Research Center (PMHARC), Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) and BEAT-HIV Delaney Collaboratory. CAB members are volunteers from diverse backgrounds who voice concerns and highlight areas of research that might not otherwise be studied. CABs provide an infrastructure that serves as a bridge between participants and researchers. Since CAB members come from the same communities as the research participants, CABs provide feedback to researchers regarding methods that are sensitive and respectful of the needs of the community. CABs also educate the community through communication of research findings in ways that are meaningful and understandable. Despite the benefits of this mutual partnership, there are challenges faced by CABs. The workshop will address some of those challenges and provide ways for community members to become active in clinical research efforts.

  • Donna Coviello University of Pennsylvania
  • Jeffery Jeene, Penn Center for AIDS Research
  • Naiymah Sanchez, MA, ACLU of Pennsylvania and UPenn CTU Board co-chair
  • Armenta Washington, MS, Fox Chase Cancer Center

With rates of overdose deaths climbing to epidemic levels in Philadelphia and across the U.S., service providers and those living in community with people living with addictions must be equipped to intervene in the event of an overdose, and to prevent overdoses before they happen. This workshop describes how to meet clients living with addiction “where they’re at” through harm reduction practice methodologies, how to identify symptoms of an overdose, and how to use Narcan (Naloxone) to revive a person who is overdosing. The second half of this workshop will be dedicated to learning how to use Narcan (Naloxone), and the first 50 people in attendance will be given a Narcan (Naloxone) Kit to carry with them.

  • Elvis Rosado Prevention Point Philadelphia

Social media websites and apps are continuing to grow in their role as the places where people gather online to read news, engage in discussion, socialize, date and more. Because of this, efforts are increasingly being made to engage and/or retain PLWHA in care using social media tools such as existing social networks or new apps with social media features. In this panel, hear from four speakers from different types of organizations that are leveraging social media to engage and retain people in care across the continuum. Bring your smartphone; you might have the chance to download these apps or follow these social media campaigns during the discussion. Social Media in the Treatment of HIV Across the Care Continuum.

  • Claire Beamish, Children’s Hospital Of Philadelphia
  • Beatrice Aladin, New York AIDS Institute – Office of the Medical Director State Department of Health
  • Winner Bell, MSW, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Ann Avery, MD, MetroHealth Medical Center

“Hey Doc, We Need to Talk” is an interactive experience designed to enhance patient-initiated information exchanges for individuals living with HIV/AIDS. The quality of patient-provider interactions is an important factor in one’s overall health care, as well as a critical component of treatment adherence and success. Navigating these interactions, however, can be difficult. Through standardized patient scenarios, personalized question development, and checklists, panelists will demonstrate strategies and tools with which patients can more effectively engage their providers in conversations surrounding HIV/AIDS. Dialogue and audience participation is highly encouraged, and will be facilitated. Individuals will walk away more confident in their ability to approach healthcare providers and advocate for their specific health needs.

  • Laura Bamford, MD, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Grace Paik, MD, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Chloe Gould
  • Steven Buffer
  • Nick Salter
  • Kristine Pham

Description: HIV diagnosis itself is a trauma and many PLHIV (Persons living with HIV) are routinely re-traumatized through lived experiences. The CDC reports 8 in 10 PLHIV report feeling internalized HIV related Stigma, which can be compounded through a variety of encounters; social opportunities; dates, hookups, relationships, families, friends, medical settings, social service agencies, as well as through systems policies and procedures. Thanks to biomedical interventions HIV is considered a chronic and manageable condition, however lack of information and education leaves society in general trapped in the 80’s in regards to attitudes towards HIV and PLHIV. Join us to define and discuss HIV stigma and how it remains the biggest hurdle to PLHIV quality of life while advocating for all HIV care, policies and procedures and those who employ them, to be rooted in a Trauma Informed Care perspective to ensure PLHIV are safe while caring for themselves.

  • Robert Pompa, MSW, LCSW

Bisexuals are in many ways a hidden population and face a number of health-care related disparities, including increased risk of HIV. Although many of us in the field use the letters, “LGBT”, the “b” is often ignored or left out of programming, discussions, and/or outreach materials. Helping service providers become more aware of bisexuality can help them become savvier about working with diverse issues around sexuality. It is important to offer services specifically to bisexual people and to help support visibility of bi folks. Invisibility is oppressive. When recognized, bisexuality is often viewed as being part gay and part straight, rather than being its own unique identity. Further, bisexuals face not only discrimination confronting the LGT community because of their non-heterosexuality, but also resistance from the LGT community. We will explore what it means to be bisexual, challenge negative stereotypes and stigma, and will help providers best prepare to meet the needs of bisexual individuals.

  • Terri Clark, MPH, Action Wellness

As Philadelphia continues to be at the epicenter of the opioid epidemic due to the purity and low cost of heroin, HIV remains epidemic among persons of color and there continue to be increases in new HCV infections. Engagement of new HIV and HCV positive individuals is difficult, especially if the participant is actively using injection drugs. Those with injection drug use histories are often skeptical of engaging in medical care because of barriers like access to care, lack of education, provider proximity, and fear of mistreatment. Additionally, drug treatment, housing needs, and lack of income are prioritized over treatment. Prevention Point Philadelphia (PPP) has implemented services to guide participants into care while addressing any barriers and participant needs. Homelessness, partnered with active injection drug use, has made it more difficult for these individuals to seek services. This presentation is meant for frontline staff who are seeking support or new strategies to link participants who may not be ready for care. The purpose is to allow service providers and frontline staff a space to collaborate ideas for increasing capacity and to share experiences with navigation in order to take best practices back to their agencies. We will discuss successes, challenges, and strategies for engaging newly diagnosed individuals. Our focus will be on discussing integrating harm reduction into testing and counseling sessions in order to bolster participant engagement.

  • Jennie Coleman, MPH, Prevention Point Philadelphia
  • Laura DeCastillo, Prevention Point Philadelphia
  • TaWanda Preston, Prevention Point Philadelphia
  • Jade McKnight, CC Change

Philadelphia city officials recently announced that they would actively encourage and support the establishment of one or more safe consumption facilities. These facilities would not only reduce the potential for fatal overdose by providing medically supervised drug consumption, but are also predicted to reduce other harms associated with drug use (disease transmission, such as HIV and hepatitis C, and injection-related infections) and serve as an access point to drug and alcohol treatment, housing, and other social services. These facilities have also been shown to reduce public drug consumption and improper disposal of drug paraphernalia. Despite a long record of positive outcomes, there are several barriers to implementing such a facility in Philadelphia, including legal impediments and public acceptance. This panel will allow attendees to hear from advocates and experts in the field and ask questions about barriers to implementation.

  • Dan Martino, Community Organizer in Kensington, PA 177th District State Representative Candidate
  • Evan Anderson, JD, PhD, Senior Fellow, Center for Public Health Initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania
  • Devin Reeves, MSW, Executive Director, Pennsylvania Harm Reduction Coalition
  • Christina Garces, MD/MA, student at Temple University Co-Founder, SOL (Save Our Lives) Collective
  • Joseph L. D’Orazio, MD, Director, Division of Medical Toxicology in Temple University Hospital’s Department of Emergency Medicine
  • Allison Herens, MSW, Opioid Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Prevention Program, Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Have you wondered who makes the decisions about HIV services in Philadelphia and in the PA and NJ suburbs? Do you have questions about how federal and state policy affects what happens locally? Do you want to know what’s happening with the Ryan White program in these uncertain times? Do you wonder how funding decisions are made? Yes? Then you should attend our interactive workshop with members of the Philadelphia HIV Integrated Planning Council and staff of the Office of HIV Planning and the AIDS Activities Coordinating Office (AACO). We will have a panel sharing information and resources like: Planning Council responsibilities and how to join, resources from the Office of HIV Planning including a searchable online HIV service directory and the Ryan White Consumer Survey results, an overview of the 2017-2021 integrated HIV care and prevention plan, and how decisions about HIV services funding are made. There will be plenty of time for questions and discussion, including time to share your ideas for an upcoming survey about the community’s knowledge and attitudes about HIV and individual’s HIV risk. You will leave with a clearer understanding of who makes the decisions and how you can participate.

  • Tiffancy Dominque, University of Pennsylvania
  • Ricardo Colon, AIDS Activities Coordinating Office
  • Mari Ross Russell, MSA, Office of HIV Planning
  • Nicole Johns, MPH, Office of HIV Planning

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to ways they can develop their skills for working with sexual minorities. Using lecture, discussion, and experiential activities, the facilitators will guide participants into a deeper awareness of their cultural conditioning around sexual orientation and gender diversity to enhance culturally competent approaches to providing HIV/AIDS services. The overall goal of the workshop is improving services for people of all genders and sexualities.

  • Jaymie Campbell, Access Matters
  • Taalibah A. Kariem-White, Access Matters

Justice and Policy

“Birddogging” is the tried and true activist tactic of putting a policy maker on the spot, in public, and hopefully on camera, with inescapable, bullet proof questions. A birddogger may decide to be perceived as a friend or foe, and birddoggers may come in groups small or large. All that is necessary is to pose a question directly to the person who has the power to give us what we’re asking for. This form of simple, direct advocacy, when applied consistently, is amazingly effective–and yet, astonishingly rare. In 2018’s election year, birddogging is how we will win the health care policies we need. Already Birddoggers put themselves on the line, and literally stopped the last Senate hearing about taking away our healthcare. By putting politicians on the spot, in-public, and in-person, birddogging is the boulder-on-the-scale tactic that stopped TrumpCare, and helped drag out the tax scam fight for months, exposing the bill as the giveaway to massive corporations and making the bill toxic to voters.

  • Paul Davis, Housing Works
  • Jose de Marco, ACT UP Philadelphia

The workshop will be focused on intersection of HIV and racial justice for people living with HIV. Our workshop primary focus is to engage the audience on the importance as to why it’s a priority to center People of Color as the drivers, decision makers, and stakeholders when we discuss the possibility of a HIV cure, educational programming, why it’s so essential to have ( MIPA) Meaningful involved of People with AIDS in every levels of decision making that affect and impacts our lives. The panel discussion will cover the barriers to meaningful involvement of people living with AIDS so there’s strategic action steps to promote meaningful inclusion of people living with HIV in early stages of HIV programs development, that will ensure that people of color living HIV are include in the decision making processes at community advisory boards within AIDS service organizations. We aims to stimulate a reburst dialogue about using strategies to end oppression that create barriers to care, and how HIV is a racial justice issue as well as a public health issue.

  • Teresa Sullivan, PWN-USA
  • Andrea Johnson, PWN -USA
  • Grace Rutha, Philadelphia FIGHT, PWN-USA
  • Waheedah Shabazz-EL, PWN -USA

Have you wondered who makes the decisions about HIV services in Philadelphia and in the PA and NJ suburbs? Do you have questions about how federal and state policy affects what happens locally? Do you want to know what’s happening with the Ryan White program in these uncertain times? Do you wonder how funding decisions are made? Yes? Then you should attend our interactive workshop with members of the Philadelphia HIV Integrated Planning Council and staff of the Office of HIV Planning and the AIDS Activities Coordinating Office (AACO). We will have a panel sharing information and resources like: Planning Council responsibilities and how to join, resources from the Office of HIV Planning including a searchable online HIV service directory and the Ryan White Consumer Survey results, an overview of the 2017-2021 integrated HIV care and prevention plan, and how decisions about HIV services funding are made. There will be plenty of time for questions and discussion, including time to share your ideas for an upcoming survey about the community’s knowledge and attitudes about HIV and individual’s HIV risk. You will leave with a clearer understanding of who makes the decisions and how you can participate.

  • Tiffancy Dominque, University of Pennsylvania
  • Ricardo Colon, AIDS Activities Coordinating Office
  • Mari Ross Russell, MSA, Office of HIV Planning
  • Nicole Johns, MPH, Office of HIV Planning

LGBTQ

In this workshop, we will discuss how shifting an organization’s values and services from cultural competency to cultural humility can transform HIV treatment and prevention. As new HIV/STI diagnoses continue to impact diverse minority communities, it is necessary to expand inclusive and culturally humble treatment and prevention efforts. Young LGBTQ+ people are among those that carry an increased burden of new HIV infections in the United States. In a social climate where LGBTQ youth continue to face rising levels of bullying and harassment, it is important for people doing HIV prevention work with youth to not only be aware of the nuances of the lives of LGBTQ+ youth, but also to foster an environment where youth can feel comfortable and empowered while accessing services. This workshop will provide you with a basic foundation to do the work! We’ll go over the relevance of LGBTQ+ youth friendly services in HIV prevention efforts. Using the framework of cultural humility, we will demonstrate how organizations can work together at all levels to facilitate an inclusive client experience and promote resources to help LGBTQ+ youth overcome systemic barriers to accessing sexual healthcare and quality HIV prevention services.

  • Samuelle Voltaire, BSW Penn Program on Sexuality, Technology & Action Research
  • Alicia Chatterjee, BA Penn Program on Sexuality, Technology & Action Research (PSTAR)

Bisexuals are in many ways a hidden population and face a number of health-care related disparities, including increased risk of HIV. Although many of us in the field use the letters, “LGBT”, the “b” is often ignored or left out of programming, discussions, and/or outreach materials. Helping service providers become more aware of bisexuality can help them become savvier about working with diverse issues around sexuality. It is important to offer services specifically to bisexual people and to help support visibility of bi folks. Invisibility is oppressive. When recognized, bisexuality is often viewed as being part gay and part straight, rather than being its own unique identity. Further, bisexuals face not only discrimination confronting the LGT community because of their non-heterosexuality, but also resistance from the LGT community. We will explore what it means to be bisexual, challenge negative stereotypes and stigma, and will help providers best prepare to meet the needs of bisexual individuals.

  • Terri Clark, MPH, Action Wellness

Learn how social media/networking sites and mHealth tools can be used to engage and help adolescents and young adults in HIV prevention and treatment as well as substance abuse treatment. At this workshop, you will learn about a multi-site project in three urban cities that are: 1) identifying and recruiting young (age 15-24) Black and Latino men who have sex with men (YBLMSM), including gender non-conforming and transgender women, who are living with HIV or at high-risk for contracting HIV by using respondent driven sampling and social media/networking sites; 2) conducting randomized control trial to test an interactive mobile-enhanced engagement intervention (mHealth app coupled with a supportive health coach trained in motivational interviewing) developed to improve engagement and retention in care, improve medication adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART; HIV treatment medication) for youth living with HIV or to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP; HIV prevention medication) for youth at high-risk for contracting HIV, provide coaching support to youth, and screen for substance use while providing counseling referral options for substance users; and 3) including the participants’ perspectives and experiences through qualitative interviews.

  • Susan Lee, MPH, CHOP
  • Nadia Dowshen, MD, MSHP CHOP
  • Marné Castillo, M.Ed., PhD CHOP
  • Anderson Schlupp, BS CHOP
  • Renata Arrington Sanders, MD, MPH, ScM, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Durryle Brooks, PhD, MA Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health

Studies have found high rates of hepatitis B (HBV) co-infection among PLWHA. For PLWHA, having an HBV co-infection can complicate disease management and lead to worse health outcomes. Additionally, recent survey data indicate that PLWHA have low rates of HBV vaccine, and are at risk for HBV infection. HBV continues to be an under-diagnosed illness among high risk communities. For far too long, HIV/HBV co-infection has remained under-prioritized throughout the public health community. It is time that we bring the impact of HIV/HBV co-infection to the forefront of our discussion to promote increased awareness, education and testing for HBV within the HIV community. Additionally, we should discuss strategies to improve vaccination rates among high risk non-immune individuals, to break the cycle of infection. This workshop is designed to first provide a brief background on HBV (epidemiology, risk factors, management of chronic infection) and discuss why it is important to understand HBV in PLWHA. The second part of this workshop will share the personal story of a patient advocate living with HIV/HBV co-infection.

  • Catherine Freeland, MPH, Hepatitis B Foundation

Approximately 1.6 million youth are homeless each year and up to 40% of those youth identify as LGBT. More than 1 in 4 teenagers are thrown out of their homes after coming out to their parents. Youth living on their own are at a higher risk for anxiety disorders, depression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suicide attempts and other health problems due to the enhanced exposure to violence. In this panel discussion, you will gain insight into the physical and mental health implications of homelessness and the current efforts that have stemmed from the City of Philadelphia lead; Philly Homes 4 Youth Housing Coalition, and other local agencies are taking to understand and address youth homelessness. This panel is for health professionals, social service providers, policy makers, community members, and anyone else interested in understanding the intersection of housing and wellness among LGBTQ youth. We hope to generate a discussion with varied perspectives, and hope you will leave with a call to action on how you can help end youth homelessness.

  • Elaina Tully, MD, Medical Director, YHEP Adolescent Health Center; Physician, John Bell Health Center / YHEP Health Center @ Philadelphia FIGHT Community Health Centers
  • Joseph Hill-Coles, Community-Navigator @ Youth Service INC.
  • Libby Mathewson, Street Outreach and Homeless Prevention Services Supervisor @ Valley Youth House

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to ways they can develop their skills for working with sexual minorities. Using lecture, discussion, and experiential activities, the facilitators will guide participants into a deeper awareness of their cultural conditioning around sexual orientation and gender diversity to enhance culturally competent approaches to providing HIV/AIDS services. The overall goal of the workshop is improving services for people of all genders and sexualities.

  • Jaymie Campbell, Access Matters
  • Taalibah A. Kariem-White, Access Matters

Love, Sex, and Relationships

Cupcakes and Crucial Conversations is a highly interactive workshop for youth , parents, community members and professionals . Participants will enjoy a relaxed environment while in engaging in open and honest conversations about crucial issues facing our youth today.
The workshop will address HOT topics such as Consent, Social media safety, Dangers hidden in apps, Bodily Autonomy, Choices and Risks involved in sexting.
Participants will engage in activities to help them understand the essential qualities of understanding who they are as individuals and how silence, shaming and stigmatized messaging may have impacted their beliefs.

This will be coupled with conversations and discussions of acceptance, self love, self esteem of oneself and others to eradicate and dismantle shameful or unhealthy perceptions and perspective.

  • Lynette Medley, M.Ed, Human Sexuality Education No More Secrets Mind Body Spirit Inc.
  • Nya McGlone, MS, Animal and Poultry Sciences No More Secrets Mind Body Spirit Inc.

Learning to celebrate God in the midst of an HIV diagnosis. Panelists share their own stories and the impact of religion and theology as barriers to HIV treatment and stigma reduction. Panelists discuss the long journey away from rejection and condemnation and toward acceptance, resilience, healing, and a renewed embrace from God.

  • Rev. Calenthia Dowdy, PhD, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Deacon Vernon Wright Beloved St. John Evangelistic Church
    Grace Rutha, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Rev. Aquarius Gilmore, U.S Department of Health & Human Services

In this workshop, participants will be introduced to ways they can develop their skills for working with sexual minorities. Using lecture, discussion, and experiential activities, the facilitators will guide participants into a deeper awareness of their cultural conditioning around sexual orientation and gender diversity to enhance culturally competent approaches to providing HIV/AIDS services. The overall goal of the workshop is improving services for people of all genders and sexualities.

  • Chip Alfred, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Berlinda Garnett, FOX 29
  • Terrence Gore , Artist, Poet, and
  • Lynette Trawick, I AM U inc.
  • Minister Cauzell Harris, Philadelphia FIGHT

Having a conversation with partners (or potential partners) about your HIV status can be a very difficult discussion. Many people living with HIV fear rejection, judgment, and discrimination when disclosing their status. Facing this stigma, people are often understandably hesitant to initiate conversations with their partners about HIV, sexual health, and prevention. Others may choose to not seek romantic or intimate relationships, oftentimes becoming lonely and isolated as a result.Disclosure is a deeply personal issue, and how and when to disclose will vary from person to person and in different social contexts. Becoming more comfortable with disclosure and communicating about sex and prevention helps to form stronger sexual and romantic connections while reducing the risk of HIV transmission. In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to share the disclosure strategies that they have used in the past and to brainstorm strategies, share experiences, and develop techniques to better communicate with their partners about HIV and sexual health. Facilitated discussion will share new tools and strategies to help participants talk about HIV as part of a broader discussion about sexual health and sexual desire.

  • David Griffith, MSW, Master of Science in Social Policy LGBT Elder Initiative
  • David Gana LGBT, Elder Initiative
  • Lee Carson, MSW, Therapist

Our workshop brings together six individuals who are living with H.I.V. All of the members of our panel have been living with H.I.V. for at least ten years, most of them for more than twenty years. The one other thing all of the members of our panel have in common is that while living with H.I.V. they have all worked either full time or part time. Currently three members of our panel are working full time and two are working part time. The final member of our panel is retired, but he worked for over 15 years as an R.N. while living with the virus.

As noted in the title of our workshop, each member of the panel will describe the various challenges and obstacles that are posed while working and living with H.I.V.; dealing with the fatigue caused by the virus, missing time from work because a compromised immune system leaves one vulnerable to colds, the flu and more serious illnesses, especially when working with the public, coping with the side effects of H.I.V. drugs, like G.I. distress, one of the most pervasive, and sometimes embarrassing side effects. Our panelists will speak about the challenge of disclosure, disclosure to supervisors, colleagues, peers, as well as the fear that one’s status might be disclosed without permission or consent.

  • Robert Kosseff, MA, COMHAR
  • Pablo Salinas , M.Ed, COMHAR
  • Jamaal Henderson, COMHAR
  • Mike, Palumbaro, COMHAR
  • Marcus Hill, COMHAR
  • Dan Mangini, University of Pennsylvania
  • Sandra Collette, Philadelphia FIGHT

Through this educational panel participants will learn about the possibilities of life after an HIV diagnosis. There will be people representing all different kinds of backgrounds, including starting a family, being young and getting a diagnosis, dealing with addiction, raising a family after a diagnosis. Participants will be encouraged to ask questions of the panelists.

  • Lashanna Williams-Shabazz
  • Felicia Clark
  • Michele Spann
  • DeVante Bell-Kershaw

Mental Healthcare and HIV

Participants will learn the importance of a self care plan and tools for developing positive self care strategies geared toward preventing burnout among social service professionals serving PLWHAs and PLWHAs themselves. This is important for the positive physical and mental health of PLWHAs and those who serve their needs. The workshop is interactive and requires involving the audience’s experiences and needs in forming strategies. It does not address specifically oppression or racism, but does provide self care strategies to help the individual be their best selves in their work to combat it.

  • Rev. Chris Kimmenez, PsyD, Healing Communities USA/ RCC Urban CDC

Description: HIV diagnosis itself is a trauma and many PLHIV (Persons living with HIV) are routinely re-traumatized through lived experiences. The CDC reports 8 in 10 PLHIV report feeling internalized HIV related Stigma, which can be compounded through a variety of encounters; social opportunities; dates, hookups, relationships, families, friends, medical settings, social service agencies, as well as through systems policies and procedures. Thanks to biomedical interventions HIV is considered a chronic and manageable condition, however lack of information and education leaves society in general trapped in the 80’s in regards to attitudes towards HIV and PLHIV. Join us to define and discuss HIV stigma and how it remains the biggest hurdle to PLHIV quality of life while advocating for all HIV care, policies and procedures and those who employ them, to be rooted in a Trauma Informed Care perspective to ensure PLHIV are safe while caring for themselves.

  • Robert Pompa, MSW, LCSW

Our workshop brings together six individuals who are living with H.I.V. All of the members of our panel have been living with H.I.V. for at least ten years, most of them for more than twenty years. The one other thing all of the members of our panel have in common is that while living with H.I.V. they have all worked either full time or part time. Currently three members of our panel are working full time and two are working part time. The final member of our panel is retired, but he worked for over 15 years as an R.N. while living with the virus.

As noted in the title of our workshop, each member of the panel will describe the various challenges and obstacles that are posed while working and living with H.I.V.; dealing with the fatigue caused by the virus, missing time from work because a compromised immune system leaves one vulnerable to colds, the flu and more serious illnesses, especially when working with the public, coping with the side effects of H.I.V. drugs, like G.I. distress, one of the most pervasive, and sometimes embarrassing side effects. Our panelists will speak about the challenge of disclosure, disclosure to supervisors, colleagues, peers, as well as the fear that one’s status might be disclosed without permission or consent.

  • Robert Kosseff, MA, COMHAR
  • Pablo Salinas , M.Ed, COMHAR
  • Jamaal Henderson, COMHAR
  • Mike, Palumbaro, COMHAR
  • Marcus Hill, COMHAR
  • Dan Mangini, University of Pennsylvania
  • Sandra Collette, Philadelphia FIGHT

Scientific research supports the connection between belief in higher power(s) and healing of our physical bodies. The goal of this panel is to examine the role of faith and faith communities in facilitating healing. Panelist will examine several of the research samples available and consider real relationships and barriers between faith, faith leaders, faith communities, and the possibilities of healing when melded with medicine.

  • Calenthia Dowdy
  • Mary L. Harper, DBHIDS
  • Lizzy Schmidt, MSN, CRNP, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Sarina DiBianca, SILOAM Wellness
  • Terry Guerra, Catholic Church

Long-term survivors – those who were diagnosed with HIV in the 1980s and early 1990s – have lived through decades of challenging conditions. From being diagnosed at times when HIV was considered a terminal illness, to the countless losses of friends and loved ones, long-term survivors have encountered many traumas and experiences with grief. While long-term survivors demonstrate tremendous resiliency, many are also dealing with the long-term effects of the sustained trauma of the AIDS crisis. Recent efforts are starting to look at HIV survivorship as being closely associated with complex post-traumatic stress disorder, a form of PTSD arising from ongoing and repetitive exposure to trauma. Additional efforts have proposed the concept of “AIDS Survivor Syndrome” to capture certain physical and mental symptoms for which long-term survivors face increased risk. This workshop will explore the physical and mental health issues that are prevalent among long-term survivors and how these issues relate to the trauma and grief experienced throughout the AIDS epidemic. Panelists include providers in the healthcare and mental health fields as well as long-term survivors talking about their personal experiences.

  • David Griffith
  • Kathleen Brady, MD, AIDS Activities Coordinating Office
  • Heshie Zinman, MBA, LGBT Elder Initiative
  • Teresa Sullivan, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Jay Segal, M.Ed, Psychology, Psychologist (Private Practice)
  • Deanne Jenkins, LGBT Elder Initiative
  • David Gana, LGBT Elder Initiative

A conversation of causation and strategies for healing trauma, stigma and rejection of PLWHIV and other vulnerable populations by their faith communities.

  • Rev. Paula Burnett-Kimmenez, AA, General Studies RHD/RCC Urban CDC
  • Rev. Chris Kimmenez, PsyD, Healing Communities USA/RCC Urban CDC

In June of 2016, The Atlantic published an important article called “Not White, Not Rich and Seeking Therapy.” The byline: “Even for those with insurance, getting mental healthcare means fighting through phone tag, payment confusion, and even outright discrimination.” The article described how a white, middle-class person had a 28% of a call back from a new therapist, but middle-class African American callers only had a 17% chance of a call back. The odds were also stacked against you if you were a male and/or perceived to be poor. A white woman calling to make an appointment with a therapist would only have to make an average of 5 calls before making an appointment, but a black male would have to make up to 80 calls. This workshop would cover how to walk through these difficulties as a minority and someone living with HIV and how to advocate for yourself while searching for a psychotherapist.

Studies have shown that patients who have regular psychotherapy appointments are retained in medical care and take their medications consistently as opposed to those that are not regularly seeing one. This workshop will cover how to begin searching for a therapist, how to find one that fits your needs along with the view of therapy through the eyes of someone who has been in therapy and that of a therapist.

  • Lupe Diaz, BA, AIDS Care Group

PrEP

The opioid epidemic has increased the numbers of people who inject drugs and therefore has increased community risk of HIV infection. Existing Pennsylvania drug treatment options do not include PrEP. This talk outlines how PrEP could importantly and easily be incorporated into many existing drug treatments, especially Medication Assisted Treatments. The design of drug treatment options are explained, including the newly established Centers of Excellence for Opioid Treatment. Finally, PrEP prescribing is overviewed to inform both the community and professionals on how the best opioid treatments include PrEP.

  • Kevin Moore, PsyD, AIDS Care Group
  • Trisha Acri, MD, AIDS Care Group

Research and Treatment

Community Advisory Boards (CABs) are one way for community members to inform, stay updated on and use findings from research that impact their communities. Behind the walls of a large university setting, communities may feel disengaged and not know how to become involved in research. At the same time, researchers may not know how to engage communities most effectively. One of the ways that the University of Pennsylvania and the Wistar Institute involve the HIV community is through the activities of four CABs affiliated with the following research initiatives: Center for AIDS Research (CFAR), Penn Mental Health AIDS Research Center (PMHARC), Clinical Trials Unit (CTU) and BEAT-HIV Delaney Collaboratory. CAB members are volunteers from diverse backgrounds who voice concerns and highlight areas of research that might not otherwise be studied. CABs provide an infrastructure that serves as a bridge between participants and researchers. Since CAB members come from the same communities as the research participants, CABs provide feedback to researchers regarding methods that are sensitive and respectful of the needs of the community. CABs also educate the community through communication of research findings in ways that are meaningful and understandable. Despite the benefits of this mutual partnership, there are challenges faced by CABs. The workshop will address some of those challenges and provide ways for community members to become active in clinical research efforts.

  • Donna Coviello University of Pennsylvania
  • Jeffery Jeene, Penn Center for AIDS Research
  • Naiymah Sanchez, MA, ACLU of Pennsylvania and UPenn CTU Board co-chair
  • Armenta Washington, MS, Fox Chase Cancer Center

Philadelphia is a major HIV cure research hub and home to several ongoing HIV cure research trials. As HIV researchers, we realize how important it is to share this information with the community, so this annual HIV Cure research update is developed with the community in mind, and the purpose is to share what is new and exciting. This workshop may also offer a unique and important voice – someone who has participated in an HIV cure trial.

  • Beth Peterson, The Wistar Institute
  • Luis J. Montaner, DVM, DPHil, The Wistar Institute
  • Pablo Tebas, MD, University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, which has affected the lives of many city residents. Drug overdoses killed 702 Philadelphians in 2015, 907 in 2016, and are expected to have killed over 1,200 in 2017 once numbers are finalized.   In 2016, 80% of drug deaths involved an opioid, and fentanyl is increasingly a contributing cause of death among overdose decedents.   To address the opioid crisis in Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Department of Public Health launched the Opioid Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Prevention Program (OSEPP) in 2017. In this session, attendees will learn about the opioid epidemic in Philadelphia and the work OSEPP is conducting to help save lives.

  • Allison Herens, LSW, Philadelphia Department of Public Health
  • Monica Sun, MPH, Philadelphia Department of Public Health
  • Ashley Kemembin, Philadelphia Department of Public Health

In light of the high incidence of HIV among YMSM, creating behavioral shifts towards routine HIV testing must be considered a priority goal. Increasing HIV testing among YMSM should thus be considered a public health priority. The success of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy’s test and treat approach rests on the ability to increase the number of YMSM who receive routine testing. Successful engagement in HIV prevention for HIV negative youth (routine HIV testing, consistent condom use, PrEP adoption) requires that YMSM overcome a series of multi-level barriers at the individual (e.g., risk awareness, self-efficacy to get tested), systems (e.g., costs, medical mistrust, lack of culturally competent care), and structural (e.g., homelessness, costs, stigma) levels. In response to these challenges, Get Connected has trained Mystery Shoppers who are YMSM ages 18 to 22 to complete assessments at HIV testing sites to learn about and hopefully address barriers and identify facilitators experienced at these locations. This presentation will describe the process of training these youth and how this methodology can be applied to other assessment of health services.

  • Marné Castillo M.Ed., PhD, CHOP
  • Jose Bauermeister, PhD, MPH, UPENN
  • Anderson Schlupp, MD, PA, RN/CRNP, LSW, LCSW, CHES, AACO, CHOP

Learn how social media/networking sites and mHealth tools can be used to engage and help adolescents and young adults in HIV prevention and treatment as well as substance abuse treatment. At this workshop, you will learn about a multi-site project in three urban cities that are: 1) identifying and recruiting young (age 15-24) Black and Latino men who have sex with men (YBLMSM), including gender non-conforming and transgender women, who are living with HIV or at high-risk for contracting HIV by using respondent driven sampling and social media/networking sites; 2) conducting randomized control trial to test an interactive mobile-enhanced engagement intervention (mHealth app coupled with a supportive health coach trained in motivational interviewing) developed to improve engagement and retention in care, improve medication adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART; HIV treatment medication) for youth living with HIV or to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP; HIV prevention medication) for youth at high-risk for contracting HIV, provide coaching support to youth, and screen for substance use while providing counseling referral options for substance users; and 3) including the participants’ perspectives and experiences through qualitative interviews.

  • Susan Lee, MPH, CHOP
  • Nadia Dowshen, MD, MSHP CHOP
  • Marné Castillo, M.Ed., PhD CHOP
  • Anderson Schlupp, BS CHOP
  • Renata Arrington Sanders, MD, MPH, ScM, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Durryle Brooks, PhD, MA Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health

Have you heard about HIV cure research? Have you ever wondered what it was all about, but weren’t sure who to ask? Here’s your chance! The purpose of this workshop is to take the mystery out of HIV cure research. Nurses and clinic staff who meet regularly with HIV cure research clinical trial participants will discuss the questions they face every day, such as:

  1. What does the process look like?
  2. What questions have been posed by people considering enrollment?
  3. How do we move from recruitment to participation?
  4. What does participation mean?
  5. What does it mean to be in a Phase I trial?
  6. What kind of care and support are given during the study?
  7.  What is an analytical treatment interruption (ATI)?
  8. How do HIV cure researchers balance the excitement of HIV cure research with having to turn down someone living with HIV who might not be able to participate in a trial?
  • Beth Peterson, The Wistar Institute
  • Kenneth Lynn, RN, University of Pennsylvania
  • Linden Lalley-Chareczko, MA, Philadelphia FIGHT
  • Katrina Millard, MS, AGPCNP-BC, The Rockefeller University

An estimated 50,000 Philadelphians have hepatitis C and at least 18% of HCV infected Philadelphians are co-infected with HIV. Whether you want to understand the basics of hep C, need to brush up on key hep C talking points, or are looking for answers to questions about hepatitis this workshop will give you an overview of hep C transmission, prevention and treatment. Learn about this epidemic, how it’s ongoing and the resources available. Come to this workshop for the info you need to be a hepatitis advocate and educator!

  • JackHildick-Smith, BS, Philadelphia Department of Public Health
  • Amy Hueber, MSW, Philadelphia Department of Public Health AIDS Activities Coordinating Office
  • Alison Roberts, BS, Philadelphia Department of Public Health
    Emily Waterman, BS, Philadelphia Department of Public Health

Sex Work

Our “Surviving and Thriving: Sex Work, Homelessness and How to Stay Safe” panel will focus primarily on the personal journeys of people experiencing homelessness who engage in sex work and survival sex. Specifically, this panel will host individuals working in the industry as a means to share their personal experiences, past or current, engaging in sex work and survival sex. This will serve as a forum for these panelists to share in a judgement free space and as a way to provide information on what they do to stay safe in all respects, including: safety while using substances, safety while engaging in sex work, safety from the police, or sexual safety. Following these lived experience narratives, we will have Nina Marsoopian, a Project Safe volunteer with lived experience herself, and Dr.  Alexis Roth, an assistant professor at the Dornsife school of Public Health at Drexel University with a wealth of relevant knowledge who is currently piloting a project designed to improve access to PrEP for women who inject drugs in Philadelphia as speakers. Nina will discuss her personal experiences both volunteering with Project Safe and as someone with lived experience as a sex worker and youth who has engaged in survival sex. Dr. Roth will discuss her work as well as the resources available in the city to support people experiencing homelessness who engage in sex work and survival sex. We want to stress once again the importance of this panel being a completely safe space and judgment free for individuals working in the sex industry and for people who use substances.

  • Project Safe Volunteer
  • Alexis Roth, Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health
  • Nina Marsoopian, BA, Project Safe and Philadelphia Red Umbrella Alliance
  • Zach Fusfeld

Spanish Language

Young people in dating relationships are navigating and developing what good love means to them. In this workshop, young people will learn and discuss the differences between a healthy, unhealthy and abusive relationship. And, begin to learn methods such as HIV risk reduction negotiating in hopes of asserting and securing consent that promote good love for both partners.

  • Lorett Matus, Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc
  • Nora Meighan, BA, Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc

Self-Care practices are non-traditional techniques that promote a healthy body, mind and spirit. Self-care practices such as Yoga, Meditation, Active Movement, and Adult Play are alternative treatment therapies which can decrease stress and boost the immune system. Participants will be able to engage in various self-care practices to promote overall well-being. First half of the workshop will include Yoga which combines physical postures, breathing exercises and relaxation practices and Meditation which is a practice that promotes relaxation. The second half of the workshop will include Active Movement a self-care practice of dancing and/or exercise and Adult Play to reduce stress and anxiety while promoting focus and self-expression.

  • Lorett Matus, Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc
  • CynthiaVazquez, Congreso de Latinos Unidos, Inc.

Women

There are many benefits of Art for people with HIV/AIDS and those who are trying to find coping strategies in dealing with a plethora of illnesses. Our society has developed new and different options to personally illustrate what individuals are experiencing emotionally, mentally and spiritually. To express what each participant is feeling deep inside themselves, this workshop will be presented in threefold. 

The first 15 minutes: 
 I will provide a demonstration for how painting may be used to expel the deepest of emotions. I will exhibit anger and begin shuffling papers, pencils and art supplies. I will find a paper that shows a woman who is very angry. I will say loudly: “This is how I feel, ANGRY!!!” I will prop up the photograph and begin to paint. Muttering my feelings, exclaiming how much my feelings affect me, I will draw the viewers in. I will show them the finished result and ask them to paint what each is feeling.
 
The second 15 minutes:
1). The viewer chooses an emotion. (Anger, shame, remorse, guilt)
2). The person begins to paint.
3). The participant must focus on making the emotion match the art they are painting. 

I will provide the painting materials necessary for each participant, from painting materials to easels. We will see a variety of emotions that each are feeling and have a need to express. Every class will end with a chance to talk about what each was feeling, what happened after Painting to Transform

  • Cassandra Jefferson, BA in Illustration
  • Susan M. Fleetwood, MHS-CECS, Be More Grateful Inc.
  • Gloria Turner MA, Med, LCDP, CAADC, Synergy Consultants and Psycho Therapy

Through snapshots of the above titled documentary, this interactive workshop will engage the audience into a triumphant testimonial experience of a gospel singer, who was widowed at 29 years of age and living with HIV. This award-winning documentary chronicles the true story of Tangy Major, a young woman, who in the ’80s unknowingly contracted HIV from her boyfriend, became pregnant, and transmitted the virus to her baby. Seven months after giving birth, she buried her son. Seven years later she buried the man who became her husband.

Tangy was HIV positive, widowed, and childless all before the age of 30. HIV/AIDS had taken almost everything she had–but it couldn’t take her faith in God and her ability to glorify him through song. Tangy’s Song! is a compelling and compassionate film that moves from tragedy to triumph–and from fear to faith–as one young HIV positive woman shares more than just her story. She shares her song! From devastation to restoration!

This is my story…

  • Tangy Major, MA

Youth

Cupcakes and Crucial Conversations is a highly interactive workshop for youth , parents, community members and professionals . Participants will enjoy a relaxed environment while in engaging in open and honest conversations about crucial issues facing our youth today.
The workshop will address HOT topics such as Consent, Social media safety, Dangers hidden in apps, Bodily Autonomy, Choices and Risks involved in sexting.
Participants will engage in activities to help them understand the essential qualities of understanding who they are as individuals and how silence, shaming and stigmatized messaging may have impacted their beliefs.

This will be coupled with conversations and discussions of acceptance, self love, self esteem of oneself and others to eradicate and dismantle shameful or unhealthy perceptions and perspective.

  • Lynette Medley, M.Ed, Human Sexuality Education No More Secrets Mind Body Spirit Inc.
  • Nya McGlone, MS, Animal and Poultry Sciences No More Secrets Mind Body Spirit Inc.

In this workshop, we will discuss how shifting an organization’s values and services from cultural competency to cultural humility can transform HIV treatment and prevention. As new HIV/STI diagnoses continue to impact diverse minority communities, it is necessary to expand inclusive and culturally humble treatment and prevention efforts. Young LGBTQ+ people are among those that carry an increased burden of new HIV infections in the United States. In a social climate where LGBTQ youth continue to face rising levels of bullying and harassment, it is important for people doing HIV prevention work with youth to not only be aware of the nuances of the lives of LGBTQ+ youth, but also to foster an environment where youth can feel comfortable and empowered while accessing services. This workshop will provide you with a basic foundation to do the work! We’ll go over the relevance of LGBTQ+ youth friendly services in HIV prevention efforts. Using the framework of cultural humility, we will demonstrate how organizations can work together at all levels to facilitate an inclusive client experience and promote resources to help LGBTQ+ youth overcome systemic barriers to accessing sexual healthcare and quality HIV prevention services.

  • Samuelle Voltaire, BSW Penn Program on Sexuality, Technology & Action Research
  • Alicia Chatterjee, BA Penn Program on Sexuality, Technology & Action Research (PSTAR)

In light of the high incidence of HIV among YMSM, creating behavioral shifts towards routine HIV testing must be considered a priority goal. Increasing HIV testing among YMSM should thus be considered a public health priority. The success of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy’s test and treat approach rests on the ability to increase the number of YMSM who receive routine testing. Successful engagement in HIV prevention for HIV negative youth (routine HIV testing, consistent condom use, PrEP adoption) requires that YMSM overcome a series of multi-level barriers at the individual (e.g., risk awareness, self-efficacy to get tested), systems (e.g., costs, medical mistrust, lack of culturally competent care), and structural (e.g., homelessness, costs, stigma) levels. In response to these challenges, Get Connected has trained Mystery Shoppers who are YMSM ages 18 to 22 to complete assessments at HIV testing sites to learn about and hopefully address barriers and identify facilitators experienced at these locations. This presentation will describe the process of training these youth and how this methodology can be applied to other assessment of health services.

  • Marné Castillo M.Ed., PhD, CHOP
  • Jose Bauermeister, PhD, MPH, UPENN
  • Anderson Schlupp, MD, PA, RN/CRNP, LSW, LCSW, CHES, AACO, CHOP

Learn how social media/networking sites and mHealth tools can be used to engage and help adolescents and young adults in HIV prevention and treatment as well as substance abuse treatment. At this workshop, you will learn about a multi-site project in three urban cities that are: 1) identifying and recruiting young (age 15-24) Black and Latino men who have sex with men (YBLMSM), including gender non-conforming and transgender women, who are living with HIV or at high-risk for contracting HIV by using respondent driven sampling and social media/networking sites; 2) conducting randomized control trial to test an interactive mobile-enhanced engagement intervention (mHealth app coupled with a supportive health coach trained in motivational interviewing) developed to improve engagement and retention in care, improve medication adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART; HIV treatment medication) for youth living with HIV or to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP; HIV prevention medication) for youth at high-risk for contracting HIV, provide coaching support to youth, and screen for substance use while providing counseling referral options for substance users; and 3) including the participants’ perspectives and experiences through qualitative interviews.

  • Susan Lee, MPH, CHOP
  • Nadia Dowshen, MD, MSHP CHOP
  • Marné Castillo, M.Ed., PhD CHOP
  • Anderson Schlupp, BS CHOP
  • Renata Arrington Sanders, MD, MPH, ScM, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Durryle Brooks, PhD, MA Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health

Approximately 1.6 million youth are homeless each year and up to 40% of those youth identify as LGBT. More than 1 in 4 teenagers are thrown out of their homes after coming out to their parents. Youth living on their own are at a higher risk for anxiety disorders, depression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suicide attempts and other health problems due to the enhanced exposure to violence. In this panel discussion, you will gain insight into the physical and mental health implications of homelessness and the current efforts that have stemmed from the City of Philadelphia lead; Philly Homes 4 Youth Housing Coalition, and other local agencies are taking to understand and address youth homelessness. This panel is for health professionals, social service providers, policy makers, community members, and anyone else interested in understanding the intersection of housing and wellness among LGBTQ youth. We hope to generate a discussion with varied perspectives, and hope you will leave with a call to action on how you can help end youth homelessness.

  • Elaina Tully, MD, Medical Director, YHEP Adolescent Health Center; Physician, John Bell Health Center / YHEP Health Center @ Philadelphia FIGHT Community Health Centers
  • Joseph Hill-Coles, Community-Navigator @ Youth Service INC.
  • Libby Mathewson, Street Outreach and Homeless Prevention Services Supervisor @ Valley Youth House